Larry Brock, Eric Munchel arrested in Capitol riot

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The FBI arrested two men on Sunday who were allegedly photographed wearing military tactical gear and holding zip ties during the violent riot at the U.S. Capitol, the Justice Department announced.

Their arrests bring the total number of individuals facing federal charges arising from a pro-Trump’s mob attack on the Capitol to 18.

Both men appeared to be photographed holding zip ties, which are used by law enforcement to restrain or detain suspects. Some counter-terrorism experts say the zip ties may have been a signal that some rioters were planning on taking hostages.

Larry Rendell Brock was arrested in Texas. He was allegedly photographed during the riot wearing a green helmet, green tactical vest with patches, a camouflage jacket and holding zip ties.

He is charged with one count of knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority and one count of violent entry and disorderly conduct on the Capitol grounds.

Mr. Brock, an Air Force veteran, confirmed to the New Yorker on Friday that he was the man photographed wearing the military helmet on the floor of the Senate chambers.

“The president asked for his supporters to be there to attend, and I felt like it was important, because of how much I love this country, to actually be there,” Mr. Brock told the magazine, adding that he intended to be peaceful.

He also told the publication that he found the zip ties on the floor and picked them up with the intention of giving them to a police officer.

Mr. Brock served in the military in 1989 before becoming part of the Air Force Reserve in 1998, retiring in 2014.

Also arrested was Eric Gavelek Munchel of Tennessee.

He appears to be the man photographed in the Senate chambers, also carrying plastic restraints. Mr. Munchel also appears to be wearing black tactical gear and a cell phone mounted on his chest, which federal prosecutors say was used to record the incident.

Mr. Munchel is charged with one count of knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted grounds without lawful authority and one count of violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

In an interview with The Sunday Times, a London newspaper, Mr. Munchel said he attended the event with his mother.

“We wanted to show that we’re willing to rise up, band together and fight if necessary,” he told the paper. “Same as our forefathers, who established this country in 1776. It was a kind of flexing of muscles.”

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